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Home > Social Security Law Attorneys > Social Security Income

Social Security Income
 
SSI is short for Social Security Income. The SSI pays monthly checks to people who are 65 or older, or disabled or blind and who have low incomes and few assets. SSI isn't just for adults. Monthly checks can go to disabled and blind children, too. People who get SSI usually get Food Stamps and Medicaid. SSI, or Social Security Income, is a program that provides income and access to Medical Assistance to children under age 18 who have a disability, are blind, or have a chronic illness. Some adults with a disability may also qualify. Eligibility for benefits is dependent upon both the individual's condition or impairment and family income.

Generally, Social Security income has two noble purposes
1.    to give assistance to aged, blind and disabled individuals who have very minimal or no income.
2.    to provide cash that would be used to meet the basic needs such as food, clothig and shelter.

The chance to get SSI depends on your income and resources. Resources imply the things you own or your property

Social security income is paid to a disabled dependent child taxable income on the parent's return. The income is reportable on the return of the person who has the legal right to receive the benefits. The social security benefits belonging to your dependent child must be added to your child's other income to see whether any of those benefits are taxable to the child. Whether the benefits are taxable will depend on the amount of benefits and amount of other income including interest or dividends. Social security is not considered earned income for EIC purposes. However, depending on your other earnings during the year, part of it may be taxable income. The person who has the legal right to receive the benefits must determine whether the benefits are subject to Social Security Income Tax . For example, if you and your child receive benefits, but the check for your child is made out in your name, you must use only your part of the benefits to see whether any benefits are taxable to you. One half of the part that belongs to your child must be added to your child's other income to see whether any of those benefits are taxable to the child. You must include the taxable part of a lump-sum payment of benefits received in the current year in your current year's income, even if the payment includes benefits for an earlier year. Generally, you use your current year's income to figure the taxable part of the total benefits received in the current year. However, you may be able to figure the taxable part of a lump-sum payment for an earlier year separately, using your income for the earlier year. You can elect this method if it lowers the taxable portion of your benefits. If you are married and file a joint return, you must combine your incomes and your social security and equivalent tier 1 railroad retirement benefits when figuring the taxable portion of the benefits. There is, however, a Social Security Income limit that you have to be aware of. To know which part of your income is not subject to tax ask the SSA or any local offices.

Social security disability benefits taxed is just like social security retirement benefits. There is no difference in the formula for determining the taxation of social security benefits - whether the benefits are age-related or disability-related, except social security benefits do not include supplemental security income disability (SSI) payments, which are not taxable.


Social Security Income Limit
Social Security Income Tax
Supplemental Security Income Disability

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