Free Consultation

1-866-998-2545

Social Security Retirement Military Benefit

Serving in the military has its responsibilities and risks. While you work in the military service you pay Social Security taxes just as a civilian do. To qualify for Social Security Retirement Military Benefit, you must have worked and paid Social Security taxes for a certain length of time. The amount needed to get credit for your work goes up each year. The number of credits you need to quality for Social Security Retirement Military Benefit depends on your age and the type of benefit for which you are eligible. No one needs more than ten years of work.

The amount of your Social Security Retirement Military Benefit is based on the type of benefit you apply for, your date of birth, and, most importantly, your lifetime earnings. And, if you are age twenty-five or older and not already receiving Social Security benefits on your own earnings record, each year they will send you a Social Security Statement that displays your earnings record and provides estimates of the Social Security Retirement Military Benefit you and your family may be eligible to receive now and in the future.

When you start receiving your Social Security Retirement Military Benefit, other members of your family may also be eligible for payments. Each member of your family may be eligible for a monthly benefit up to fifty percent of your Security Retirement Military Benefit amount. There is a limit, however, to the total amount of money that can be paid to a family on your Social Security record. The limit varies but is generally equal to one hundred fifty to one hundred eighty percent of your Security Retirement Military Benefit.

Social Security Retirement Military Benefit for instance can be paid to your husband or wife if he or she is age sixty-two or older unless he or she collects a higher Social Security benefit on his or her own record; your husband or wife at any age if he or she is caring for your child - the child must be under age 16 or disabled and receiving Social Security benefits; and your children, if they are unmarried and under age 18; under age 19, but in elementary or secondary school as a full-time student; or age 18 or older and severely disabled.

If you are receiving widows or widowers benefits, you can switch to your own retirement benefits as early as age sixty-two assuming you're eligible and your retirement rate is higher than your widow(er)'s rate. The rules are complicated and vary depending on your situation, so talk to a Social Security representative about the options available to you.
List of Cities and Counties in California